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Could the Wisdom of Ancient Chinese Thinkers Help Our Current Political Climate?

Stars and Confucius

Could the Wisdom of Ancient Chinese Thinkers Help Our Current Political Climate?

I recently came across an interesting article on LinkedIn: The Importance of Breaking Free of…Yourself. It was adapted from a new book published by Simon & Schuster entitled The Path, written by Michael Puett and Christine Gross-Loh. Michael is a popular professor at Harvard. While the article was targeted at new college grads and young professionals rather than a middle aged male, it resonated with me on several levels.

First, the idea of being open and even intentionally seeking ideas and people outside our usual beliefs and experience is a practice that I’ve found wonderfully educational and spiritually nourishing. Especially the last several years as I’ve stumbled across opportunities or sought such experiences and spaces with more intention.

Some of this has come from a couple of groups I help facilitate called Think Again and Faith Again. But some of my most meaningful and heart connecting experiences have been as I’ve engaged in Living Room Conversations in my home and in local Village Square events that I’ve participated in. These forums have given me and others the opportunity, to, as the authors of this article encourage:

“…instead of embracing your self, Confucius urged, overcome your self. Break from who you think you are, because that is how you will change and grow.”

As a Christian, this sounded very similar to Christ enjoining us to find ourselves by losing ourselves.

This leads to my second moment of resonating and the point of me sharing this: What if we approached our political space in this same fashion? What would happen if a politician—rather than extolling their virtues, values, and ideas as the only right way—actually sought to understand and have some respect for those who differ from them? What if we, as voters, did the same? Would the tone and timber of our political conversations change for the better? Would the possibility of progress on some of our most pressing and painful issues be more likely? Would there be greater goodwill and cooperation among us all? Might we better live our nations’ dictum: epluribus unum i.e. out of many one, as well as help quell some of the strident contention that seems to pervade our public square?

Yes! Of course! But practically speaking, how do we get there from here? One way, these authors suggest, is to practice rituals. Rituals? Really? Here’s their reasoning:

“Engaging in rituals in a Confucian sense, though, is transformative. Confucian rituals — or “as if” rituals — come from the small conventional things we do all the time. When you pass a friend on the street and smile and say hi as if you weren’t just stressing over a bad exam grade you got, you’re engaging in an as-if ritual. When you’re tempted to roll your eyes over something your annoying cousin said, but instead respond as if what she said was insightful, you’re engaging in an as-if ritual. 

Yes, these moments go against our authentic, true feelings. They can feel fake, or like we’re being nice for politeness’ sake. 

But Confucius saw value in such rituals — if we do them ritually, and not rotely—precisely because they go against your authentic, true feelings and thus have the potential to allow you to become a different, and a better, person for a brief moment. The more you consciously engage in such moments the more you cultivate yourself. You train yourself not to always act true to yourself, in order to behave better.”

Interesting idea isn’t it? One presidential candidate especially leapt to mind when I read this, because, as best I can tell, his “authenticity” of “telling it like it is” is exactly what is so appealing to his supporters. And, given the natural course and feel of politics, one can sympathize with this hunger for a politician “being real.”

But what if Confucius and Christ actually had it right? What if we practiced treating others like we would like to be treated? What if we expected our politicians to do the same? What if, rather than expressing our rage or dismissal of another’s opinion, we “overcome ourselves” and give the person an authentic and real heartfelt hearing? Would that give space for them to do the same for us? What if we practiced the ritual of “walking in another’s shoes?” At a minimum, what if we at least try ritually “faking it until we make it?

Professor Puett concludes:

“The end result of all of this? As you cultivate your ability to break from yourself, you will continue to grow and change. As you cultivate your goodness, it slowly becomes second nature and radiates outward. Your kindness, rooted in the mundane and everyday, extends from the family and friends around you to town, region, nation, world.

That’s why our Chinese philosophers would say: don’t discover who you are, let alone embrace what you find. Instead of choosing self-acceptance, choose self-cultivation. Instead of embracing yourself, overcome yourself. This is not just how you become a flourishing adult. It is the best way to create a flourishing world.”

Shall we give it a try?

Jay Griffith, Salt Lake Village Square Leadership Team Member
Jaygriffith4@gmail.com



Civil Politics: More Information does not necessarily lead to Civility

logo-civil-politicsFrom CivilPolitics.org:

A recent article by Ezra Klein at Vox.com eloquently makes an argument that we at CivilPolitics have also done a lot of research in support of – specifically, that if you want to affect many behaviors, you cannot just appeal to individuals’ sense of reason. The article is well worth a complete read and is excerpted below, but the gist of it details a simple clear study by Dan Kahan and colleagues, showing that individuals who are good at math stop using their rational skills when the use of those skills would threaten their values.

Read the entire CivilPolitics post online here.

Read the Ezra Klein piece here.



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